Tom Simard

Poetry, Music, and Prose

Archive for the category “Classical”

Friday’s Choice

Advertisements

Friday’s Choice

Sunday’s Choice

Sunday’s Choice

Saturday`s Choice

Saturday’s Choice

Thursday’s Choice

Friday’s Choice

Sunday’s Choice

Saturday’s Choice

Sunday’s Choice

Monday’s Choice

Wednesday’s Choice

Wednesday’s Choice

Wednesday’s Choice

This will be the last of the Haydn pieces. Hopefully, you’ve enjoyed them, and they will encourage you to listen to more of his wonderful work.

Wednesday’s Choice

Wednesday’s Choice

Here is Haydn’s String Quartet Op. 76, no 4, called the Sunrise:

Wednesday’s Choice

We all have perceptions of a particular composer’s sound. The more I listen to Haydn the more I understand he has many voices, and like that line in the New Testatment says, none are without meaning.

This symphony written between 1771-1772 has been called the grandfather of the 5th, which Beethoven began working on some 30 years later.

Wednesday’s Choice

Wednesday’s Choice

From Haydn’s The Creation – The Overture (The Representation of Chaos):

 

Of the Wednesdays to follow

As I’m sure you’re all aware, music has always been important to me; I really can’t imagine life without it.  Usually I go through phrases where I listen to a particular kind of music or artist.  But through the years there has always been a constant.: Haydn.  It’s a rare day indeed when I don’t listen to Papa. For the foreseeable future, the idea is to share with you some of the treasures I’ve found.  Whether you agree with the following statements or not, I do hope you’ll come along and enjoy the journey.

“It’s not holy music, it’s like you and me; it’s very human and shows very normal feelings. More so than Beethoven. I feel better as a person and better in my life when I play Haydn. All art is about searching for answers about what happens after death. Haydn is the one who says, ‘I don’t have the answer, but it’s good, so who cares?'”

Adam Fischer from the Guardian article, The great Haydn road trip

“Haydn is the music of the future still. The true extent of his greatness is for the connoisseur a well-kept secret, for the larger public a ticking time-bomb that has yet to go off. When its hour comes, the explosion, rather than a Big Bang, will be a still small voice telling of the strange within the normal, the vast within the modest, the dark within the bright and vice versa: the essence of human experience in essentially musical terms.”

from Robin Holloway’s On Music: Essays and Diversions

 

 

Wednesday’s Choice

Wednesday’s Choice

Wednesday’s Choice

Wednesday’s Choice

Number 20 in Classical is Bach’s Sonatas and Partitas for Solo Violin:

Wednesday’s Choice

Number 19 in Classical is Mozart’s Divertimento in E-Flat.

Wednesday’s Choice

Number 18 in Classical is Schubert’s String Quintet in C Major:

Wednesday’s Choice

Number 17 in Classical is Antonín Dvořák’s Concerto for Cello in in B minor, Op. 104.

Wednesday’s Choice

Number 17 in Jazz is Bill Evans’ Explorations:

Wednesday’s Choice

Number 16 in Classical is Chopin’s Piano Concerto No. 1 in E Minor:

Wednesday’s Choice

Number 15 in Classical is Haydn’s Piano Sonatas.

Wednesday’s Choice

Number 14 in Classical is Bach’s Orchestral Suites.

Wednesday’s Choice

Number 13 in Classical is Mozart’s Clarinet Quintet in A Major:

Wednesday’s Choice

Number 12 in Classical is Beethoven’s Appasionata:

Wednesday’s Choice

Number 11 in Classical is Corelli’s 12 Concerti Grossi, Op. 6.

Wednesday’s Choice

Number 10 in Classical is Scarlatti’s Sonatas:

Wednesday’s Choice

Number 9 in Classical is Bach’s the Brandenburg Concertos:

Sketch 2: Some Wide Pastoral Spread

I love trains. There is nothing quite like sitting leisurely admiring the landscape rolling out before one’s eyes, talking with fellow passengers, or just being engrossed in a book. I’ve had some good reads over the years including The Glass Bead Game and Zen and the Art of Motorcycle Maintenance.

I once had a timetable of train routes throughout the world. I’d lie in bed and calculate my journeys, the longest being the Trans-Siberian Railway from Moscow to Vladivostok.

While I never did make it to Russia, after finishing my B.A. I did get a three-month Eurail pass and spent the summer of 1984 travelling across Europe. It was and will probably remain the longest trip of my life.

Not having much in the way of money, I stayed in cheap hotels or hostels or slept on the train. For food, I usually got bread from a baker’s (is there any better than a French baguette?) and some cheese and lunch meat, and voilà! I found wine in shops incredibly affordable.

Although it was the day before MP3 players, I did have a mini-recorder with songs. Here is one of the ones I brought along:

I got as far west as Sligo where I visited relatives, and as far east as Vienna, which did not, I should say, exactly greet me with open arms. I got as far north as Bergen, and would love to have spent more time in Scandinavia, but the prices drove me southward to Rome.

I fell in love with Italy. I remember the sun, which has always seemed to me the most logical heavenly body to worship, the wonderful gelato, and the noise of Rome.

The poem describes the Italian landscape I saw.  One can read here about the pastoral. Speaking of which, why not listen to Beethoven’s symphony:

William Carlos Williams was the first American poet to really speak to me.  It was likely through him that I became aware of Ezra Pound, who was a friend of his for more than half a century. Pound’s poetry never did much for me. To some, he is known as a champion of Modernism.  Others, myself included, remember him as a raving anti-Semite/fascist, who after spending WWII in Italy broadcasting propaganda over the airways was arrested for treason:

Ezra_Pound_1945_May_26_mug_shot

Security_cages_where_Ezra_Pound_was_held,_Pisa,_Italy,_1945

Wednesday’s Choice

Number 8 in Classical is Haydn’s String Quartets.

Wednesday’s Choice

Number 7 in Classical is Vivaldi’s The Four Seasons.

Listen to spring.

Wednesday’s Choice

Number 6 (Classical) is Rachmaninoff’s Rhapsody on a Theme of Paganini, Op. 43.

Have a listen.

Wednesday’s Choice

Number 5 (Classical) is Puccini’s Tosca.

Listen to Maria Callas sing Vissi d’arte.

Wednesday’s Choice

Number 4 (Classical) is Brahms’ Violin Concerto in D Major, Op. 77.

Here is a part (II. Adagio)  and here is the complete work.

Wednesday’s Choice

Number 3 (Classical) is Mozart’s The Requiem Mass in D Minor.

Take a little listen.

Wednesday’s Choice

Number 2 in Classical is the Chopin nocturnes.

If you like, listen to one or many.

Wednesday’s Choice

My Number 1 pick for Classical Music Piece(s) is Bach’s Cello Suites.

Here is Pablo Casals playing Nr.1, BWV 1007:   http://tinyurl.com/cnwxo7r

Roll Over

The Beatles were on the radio constantly as a child, and whenever I hear one of their early songs I’m transported back magically as if I were Tony on that old TV series, The Time Tunnel. The Byrds’ Turn! Turn! Turn! does it as well.

For a long time as the youngest in the family, I didn’t own but was permitted to play albums provided I was careful.

If rock music was in the foreground, classical music was in the background. My dad listened to it constantly. He was also a big fan of Beverly Sills and would occasionally play opera, which was incomprehensible to me as a child but made for some very childish antics, which amused everyone and offended no-one. His feelings for opera could be summed up succinctly: The Italians understand opera. Most of the time, however,when his stereo wasn’t being used for ill purposes, symphonies were heard.

My dad and I had a shtick going: I’d make fun of Beethoven, whom he considered a master, and he would distort his perfectly good singing voice to sound like Dylan, the man I considered master.

It would be years before I would be able to appreciate classical music.

The turning point came when at sixteen my brothers walked in on me listening to Days of Future Passed. “It’s classical music,” my oldest brother said with all the scorn he could muster.

The unintended consequence of his comment was the beginning of a discovery that continues until this day.

Post Navigation

%d bloggers like this: