Tom Simard

Poetry, Music, and Prose

Archive for the tag “painting”

Being the Youngest 1

“The neighbors’ house needs painting. You’re such a good little worker. Here’s a can of paint. Surprise them!”

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Sketch 7: Winter

I do love winter.

Nothing compares to the sight of snowflakes falling.  The closest I have come to hearing it expressed is:

“Deep beneath the cover of another perfect wonder
Where it’s so white as snow”

In terms of painting, Lucas van Valckenborch’s Winter:

Winter

Growing up, I was fortunate to be surrounded by snow.  There were snowmen to build and snowballs to throw. Forts were constructed and tunnels dug.  We climbed steep hills with our sleds and then sped down them.

In midwinter after snowstorms we’d carefully remove the storm window of our second floor bedroom, and jump, sinking down into the huge drifts of snow.

Hours upon hours were spent outside until your cheeks were red from the biting cold, and you went inside for a cup of hot chocolate to warm up before you went out again.

In the backyard the creek froze over, and we’d clear it with shovels and brooms.  If you kept skating you’d arrive in the city, which even then I knew led to the whole wide world.

Sketch 4: A Man Fallen

It was a beautiful spring day when I went for my morning walk.  I was nearing my home when I saw what at first I wasn’t able to process: an arm moving about near a curb where a number of taxis were parked.  The motion was similar to that of Icarus in that famous painting.  As I approached I realized it was an old man who had fallen in the street near a curb where a number of taxis were parked. He had hit his forehead and was bleeding.  I tried to lift him but was unable to, and so I looked about and elicited help from a passerby.  We got him up and seated on a nearby park bench.   A woman seeing his condition went to a nearby kiosk and got some water, and when she returned began to clean off his forehead.  Should we call an ambulance?  Did he want us to call someone to pick him up?  He answered no to both, and what was clear in his beautiful blue eyes was that he didn’t want be a burden to anyone.

Canaletto

I do love Canaletto.

800px-Canaletto_Return_of_the_Bucentoro_to_the_Molo_on_Ascension_Day,_1732._Royal_Collection._Windsor.

Here are 585 of his works.

Tracy Cooper (in this article) says of him, “Of all the Venetian view painters, Canaletto took the most trouble to give every single one of the figures its own character and individuality. This is even truer of the dogs which clearly held a special place in his affections – each one is portrayed with movement and vibrancy.”

I’ve not counted, but there are an awfully lot of dogs!

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